Q&A with Missy Young, Owner of Animal Talk and Missy’s Rescue

 

Q&A with Missy Young, Owner of Animal Talk and Missy’s Rescue

Walking and Talking with Lake City’s Own Animal Whisperer

Enjoy Lake City (ELC) recently met with Missy Young, owner of Animal Talk and Missy’s Rescue. Animal Talk is a full-line pet supply store and Missy’s Rescue is a no-kill shelter for all types of animals who are available for adoption and foster care.

It was a busy day and Missy was multi-tasking. We walked and talked through the store and shelter as Missy answered phones, advised pet owners on a number of dilemmas, waited on customers, completed an adoption, worked with volunteers and used her cat whispering skills to reassure a long haired cat named Bazinga who was definitely not happy about getting his nails trimmed.

All around us were cats and kittens, puppies, snakes, prairie dogs, parrots, chameleons and tarantulas, – whew! – bunnies, love birds, chipmunks, hamsters, possums, sugar gliders and many other furry and scaly friends waiting for homes.

MISSY YOUNG CALMS                                                                                                                        BAZINGA THE CAT AS                                                                                                                                 MINDY GROOMS HIS NAILS.

ELC: Why did you choose Lake City as your business location?

We opened for business on January 1, 1990 in the Roosevelt district. Several years ago, for a variety of reasons, I decided I wanted to close up and move to Alaska. When my customers and friends found out what I was thinking, they didn’t want me to go out of business and even helped me out with several months’ rent on a new place. I live in Bothell so I used to drive past here all the time and I saw the old Rimrock bar was up for sale. We’ve done a lot of work on the store and we’re still working on it.

ELC: How did you get into this line of work?

I am a third generation animal person! Both sets of my grandparents and both my parents were involved with animals. In my family, we had zoo curators and we were show people — we had show dogs and cats. My dad used to run the Bellevue Humane Society and he was also a herpetologist. I remember putting on my rubbers early in the morning to go with him into the field to look for rattlesnakes. I grew up in the day when you could have monkeys and ocelots, lions and tigers, orangutans and alligators which are all no longer legal to own. I have my exotic license though, so we do offer some exotics. We have hedgehogs and prairie dogs, short tail opossums, chipmunks and sugar gliders.


THIS LITTLE PARROT IS ONE OF MANY BIRDS                LOOKING FOR A HOME.

EDWINA, THE PYTHON, IS ALSO AVAILABLE FOR ADOPTION

 

ELC: Where do the rescue animals come from?

Some of these are feral cats who have been living outside all of their lives. They can be difficult to place in homes. In fact, I have a couple of feral cats here now that another shelter in Wenatchee sent to me to see if I could work with them. Other animals are given up by their owners. Many owners give up their animals when they move to another place that won’t accept animals. Other animals have been neglected. Kind of an unusual rescue situation happened just recently. I got two veiled chameleons within a week of each other. You almost never see these animals as rescue animals and here there were two of them from two different places. That’s Pascal in the corner.

PASCAL, A VEILED CHAMELEON, TAKING IT EASY WHILE WAITING FOR A NEW HOME

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WAFFLES’  FOOTBALL CARD.

ELC: Were some of your kittens in the Hallmark Channel’s Kitten Bowl on Superbowl Sunday?                                                    

No, we wanted to, but it turned out they film it way in advance and actually all of the kittens on the show were already adopted a long time ago.

But we had our own “team”. We made up football cards for them and used the cards to advertise for homes for the kittens.

 

 

ELC: What do you like best about Lake City?

Lake City is the Greenwich Village of Seattle. It’s so diverse and it’s a  little  eclectic. Lake City is also it’s own little place. Everything is here – you have a post office and restaurants and a library, It’s everything in a compact space.

ELC: And now it has a pet store and shelter too! What would you say are some of your most popular items or services?

ID tags, our grooming services, adoption services, and our dog training classes.

BEFORE
AND AFTER GROOMING – LOOKIN’ GOOD!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As we finished our “Walk and Talk” interview, ELC left as Missy stayed in motion – working with a customer on adopting a kitten, answering a phone and responding to a volunteer’s question about stocking the shelves. Even the animals have a hard time keeping track of her! If you need pet supplies or need advice, go check out Lake City’s own Animal Whisperer!

HEY, WHERE’D SHE GO?

Animal Talk and Missy’s Rescue is located at 12322 Lake City Way, Seattle WA 98125
Open Mon- Sat, 11 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. & Sun 12 – 5:00 p.m.

206-526-1558 AnmlTlk@aol.com

http://www.animal-talk.com